We're in lockdown. And our sports are suffering.

The lockdown has stopped all sports, threatening the existence of some of our most cherished clubs. If we don't do something now, there may be no clubs left standing when things go back to normal.

Reddish Villa JFC, Stockport - one of the clubs taking part in #SaveOurSports

#SaveOurSports is a campaign that aims to raise money for grassroots sports teams and clubs by encouraging kids and adults alike to Keep Active, Raise Money and #SaveOurSports.

Brought to life by three Manchester startups, the campaign will ensure 100% of the funds raised go to the clubs that sign up. Collctiv, MissKick and Orfi Active are all in the sporting sector, and their founders are all sports people, including a former Liverpool & Manchester City footballer, and a GB volleyballer. Not only are these business founders missing their own sport, some of them also have children who are now housebound and not playing sport.

Amy Whitell, CEO & Co-founder of Collctiv said, "I run a women's basketball league in Stockport, which has been an incredible place for women of all ages and abilities to come and try out basketball in a friendly setting. All of that has now gone, and I just hope the group will still be standing at the end of all this."

The current coronavirus pandemic and consequent lockdown has had a huge impact on everyone, across all regions of the UK, in every aspect of our lives. The risks to our health and the strain to the economy are not the only factors that the government needs to balance over the next 12-24 months as we ease out of lockdown. Chris Whitty, the Chief Medical Officer, has repeatedly highlighted the indirect risks of lockdown on both mental health and socioeconomic deprivation, which in turn could lead to increases in non-COVID related physical health issues.

Alfred, aged 6, Stockport - missing his karate training sessions

A recent government study backed by Sport England looked into the impact of sport in our communities and found that 'the most convincing evidence concerns health benefits, which prevent or reduce physical and mental health problems and save on health care costs. There are some negative health effects from sports injuries, typically for younger people, but in comparison the positive health benefits from sport are more substantial, population-wide and particularly important to older people.'

The first fundraising activity promoted by the campaign will be a National Sports Day on 8th May, the bank holiday Friday. Children all over the UK are no longer in school and it is unlikely they will have a sports day this summer. We're calling on all sports clubs and members to keep this British tradition alive! We want to see children and parents doing egg and spoon races, sprints, and other challenges, from the safety of their own homes, all while keeping active and raising money.

Join us and Keep Active, Raise Money and #SaveOurSports!

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